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Dodie's Dream World - Complete Chaos! xxx
Dodies Kitchen

Dodies Dream Kitchen

Fabulous Fairtrade Choca Mocha Cake

Image result for image Fairtrade choca mocha

Serves: 16
Prep time: 1 hour
Cook time: 35 minutes

              To make the cake


  • Preheat the oven to gas mark 4/180°C/fan oven 160°C.
  • Line the bases of two deep, 20cm cake tins with non-stick parchment and rub the sides with a little of the margarine.
  • Place the margarine and sugar in a food processor and whizz until combined.
  • Sift together the flour, cocoa, bicarbonate of soda and baking powder, and add to the mixer.
  • Beat the eggs with the milk, pour into the mixer and blend until well combined. Scrape down the sides and whizz once more.
  • Divide the mixture between the tins and bake for 30–35 minutes, until the top is springy and the cake has begun to shrink from the sides of the tin. Leave in the tin for 5 minutes before turning out on to a wire rack to cool. Peel off the parchment bases.

To make the icing

  • Melt the dark chocolate, broken into pieces, either in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water or in the microwave.
  • Combine the butter, icing sugar and cocoa in a food processor until smooth, or use a hand whisk. Whisk in the cooled coffee and melted chocolate until smooth.
  • Split each cake in 2 to create 4 even rounds. Place one on a serving plate or stand, spread with icing and continue with all the cakes. Use a palette knife to spread the top of the cake with icing, swirling to create a pattern. Cover the sides of the cake with the remaining icing.

NB: If you don’t have a food processor, combine all the ingredients using an electric whisk or beat by hand.

Image result for image Fairtrade choca mochaFor the decoration

  • To make the curls and shards; melt each of the chocolates separately, as before. Pour out onto a marble board or the clean underside of a heavy metal baking tray keeping the chocolates separate and chill for 10–15 minutes, until just set.
  • Holding a long knife at a 45 degree angle to the chocolate, push it away from you to create curls. The milk chocolate will curl and the dark will create long thin shards. If the chocolate is too cold or too warm it won’t behave properly; leave at room temperature or chill again to reach the right consistency.
  • Scatter over the cake.
Dodies Dream Kitchen
A message to Willowdown in Thailand

Michael - Here's a recipe for you.

ANISE COOKIES (SPRINGELE)

1 lb. confectioners' sugar
4 eggs
4 cups flour
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tbsp. melted butter
1/2 lemon
8 drops anise flavouring

Beat eggs and sugar 10 to 15 minutes in mixer.
Add melted butter, flour and flavoring.
Roll out 1/4 inch thick and cut out.
Let stand at least 6 hours or overnight.
Bake at 325 degrees for 20 minutes or until edges are brown.
Makes 5 to 6 dozen if small cookie cutter is used.




Can use a springele roller and cut out.

A Brief Bit of Springerle History

Today I believe it is very rare indeed to find a craftsman that works on producing these fantastic works of true useable art. There may be one or two in the United States and only a few that I know of in Europe that carve Springerle molds. Please look for the links to those that I know.

The general consensus from what I have found is that Springerle were first made in German speaking Europe, mainly Southern Germany, the Alsace region of France and parts of Switzerland.

Springerle molds were made from clay, wood and metal. Many of the ancient molds that have survived can be found in European museums and in private collections. There are a few collections in America as well. On this site you will be able to view some of the molds from the Mildred Jenson collection.

The origin of the Springerle name seems to be attributed to the fact that many of the first molds were of horses and their riders. Also, that some Springerle cookies seems to "spring up", when baked. There are dimensions formed as the cookie bakes, with the top "springing up" from the base.

Biblical scenes were some of the earliest images portrayed in Springerle. Other scenes soon followed that reflected daily life, such as holidays, births, weddings, engagements, country living, gardening, etc.

Springerle impressions have been used for centuries as tellers of tales, educational media, betrothal tokens between lovers and also just the pure enjoyment of everyday living.
DODIES DREAM KITCHEN

Vegetarian Bulgogi Bowl
By By Beth Styles | Photo Kristi Schiffman
Posted On: 04/01/2012        "Go to   Vegetarian <i>Bulgogi</i> Bowl - Sauce Magazine

I have a confession to make: When I was assigned this dish to “vegetize,” I had no idea what it was. All I could deduce without any research was a) it contained meat and b) it was served in a bowl. A quick ride on the Internet brought me up to speed, and I learned that bulgogi is most commonly associated with a Korean dish typically made with thin slices of sirloin that are marinated in a flavorful fusion of soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, pepper and other add-ins. It’s traditionally grilled – and packed with spice – so you can take its translation (“fire meat”) quite literally.

What substitute could possibly take on such a savory task? The easy route would’ve been to use our old
friend, seitan. It holds up well to pan-frying, but I wasn’t sure I could pump enough flavor into it. Instead, I turned to an old nemesis, something I’ve tried time and time again to prepare in a way that makes even meat-atarians drool: tofu.

For me, this block of soy is like pie crust for a beginning baker – something you desperately want to make delicious but you have to put in the work to make it happen. When it turns out totally wrong, you need to get back on the horse and push through all the pain of, well, trying … over and over.

I’m happy to report that this recipe helped me break through to the other side (a place I like to call “awesome”). I’ve finally unlocked the secret to tasty tofu: Get as much water out of it as possible so it can soak up all the flavor you feed it.
For those of you unfamiliar with kimchee, I must warn you; it packs a bit of a punch. At its core, it’s pickled cabbage jarred with a slew of fiery spices. When you first taste it, it leaves a slightly bitter taste in your mouth. Bulgogi mellows it a bit, since the meat carries a nice sweetness.
Bulgogi Veggie

I decided to marry it with day-old rice, as the longer the rice sits after cooking, the more it dries out. This means it better absorbs all that sweet and spicy flavor, much like pressing the moisture out of tofu before you marinate it.

So I guess this recipe is a great lesson in flavor: how to extract certain elements so you can inject others
and, hopefully, end up with a dish that tickles your taste buds and – at least for me – expands your horizons.


Bulgogi
1 12-oz. package extra-firm tofu
½ onion, sliced thin
4 green onions, green and white parts, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2/3 cup soy sauce
6 tbsp. sesame oil, divided
6 tbsp. sugar
1 tbsp. honey
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 tbsp. mirin
¼ cup unpeeled, shredded Asian pear
2 tbsp. water
1 tsp. sesame seeds

Kimchee Fried Rice
1½ tbsp. canola oil
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
2½ cups day-old cooked white rice
1½ cups kimchee, chopped (with juices)
2 tbsp. soy sauce
2 green onions, sliced horizontally
2½ tsp. sesame seeds
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

DAY 1
• Line a plate with 4 paper towels. Remove the tofu from its package and place on the towel-lined plate. Cover with another 4 paper towels, and place a heavy skillet or pot on top. Let sit for 1 hour to draw out as much moisture as possible.
• Discard the paper towels and slice the tofu into ¼-inch thick pieces. Layer the pieces in a small, deep dish, making sure the tofu lies flat so it won’t break. Top with the onion, green onion and garlic. Set aside.
• In a medium bowl, combine the soy sauce, 4 tablespoons of sesame oil, sugar, honey, pepper, mirin, Asian pear, water and sesame seeds. Mix well and pour over the dish with the tofu and vegetables, making sure the liquid covers the tofu. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight, or at least 8 hours.

DAY 2
• Make the kimchee fried rice: Heat the canola oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Add the eggs and cook, stirring, about 2 to 3 minutes, or until set. Add the day-old rice and mix well. Add the kimchee (with its juice) and soy sauce and stir until evenly combined. Remove from heat and add the green onions, sesame seeds and pepper. Set aside and keep warm while you make the bulgogi.
• Now, make the tofu bulgogi: Remove the tofu from the dish and place on a plate, reserving the marinade and vegetables.
• Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of sesame oil over medium heat in a cast-iron skillet.
• Once hot, add half of the tofu in one layer, being sure not to overcrowd the skillet.
• Pour half of the reserved marinade and vegetables over the tofu in the skillet. Cook until the marinade has reduced completely, then flip the tofu. Cook an additional 1 to 2 minutes, or until the tofu is well browned on both sides. Repeat with the second half of the tofu and marinade mixture.
• Serve over kimchee fried rice and 5 ounces of sauteed vegetables (mushrooms, carrots, baby bok choy, etc.).


Recipe
Bulgogi with Kimche Fried Rice

INGREDIENTS

For the bulgogi

1 12-oz. package extra-firm tofu
½ onion, sliced thin
4 green onions, green and white parts, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
²∕³ cup soy sauce
6 Tbsp. sesame oil, divided
6 Tbsp. sugar
1 Tbsp. honey
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
2 Tbsp. mirin
¼ cup unpeeled, shredded Asian pear
2 Tbsp. water
1 tsp. sesame seeds


For the kimchee fried rice

1½ tbsp. canola oil
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
2½ cups day-old cooked white rice
1½ cups kimchee, chopped (with juices)
2 tbsp. soy sauce
2 green onions, sliced horizontally
2½ tsp. sesame seeds
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

PREPARATION

DAY 1
• Line a plate with 4 paper towels. Remove the tofu from its package and place on the towel-lined plate. Cover with another 4 paper towels, and place a heavy skillet or pot on top. Let sit for 1 hour to draw out as much moisture as possible.
• Discard the paper towels and slice the tofu into ¼-inch thick pieces. Layer the pieces in a small, deep dish, making sure the tofu lies flat so it won’t break. Top with the onion, green onion and garlic. Set aside.
• In a medium bowl, combine the soy sauce, 4 tablespoons of sesame oil, sugar, honey, pepper, mirin, Asian pear, water and sesame seeds. Mix well and pour over the dish with the tofu and vegetables, making sure the liquid covers the tofu. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight, or at least 8 hours.

DAY 2
• Make the kimchee fried rice: Heat the canola oil in a wok or large skillet over medium heat. Add the eggs and cook, stirring, about 2 to 3 minutes, or until set. Add the day-old rice and mix well. Add the kimchee (with its juice) and soy sauce and stir until evenly combined. Remove from heat and add the green onions, sesame seeds and pepper. Set aside and keep warm while you make the bulgogi.
• Now, make the tofu bulgogi: Remove the tofu from the dish and place on a plate, reserving the marinade and vegetables.
• Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of sesame oil over medium heat in a cast-iron skillet.
• Once hot, add half of the tofu in one layer, being sure not to overcrowd the skillet.
• Pour half of the reserved marinade and vegetables over the tofu in the skillet. Cook until the marinade has reduced completely, then flip the tofu. Cook an additional 1 to 2 minutes, or until the tofu is well browned on both sides. Repeat with the second half of the tofu and marinade mixture.
• Serve over kimchee fried rice and 5 ounces of sauteed vegetables (mushrooms, carrots, baby bok choy, etc.).


DODIES DREAM KITCHEN
Quick recipe for a super dipping or pouring sauce.
Found on the side of a Sarson's Vinegar Bottle.

SOY AND CHILLI DRESSING FROM SARSON'S.

Whisk together, 100ml good soya sauce - 1 tbsp Seseme Oil.
1 tbsp Dry Sherry (Optional) -  3 tbsp Sarson's malt Vinegar.
Stir in 1tbsp brown sugar and a seeded and finely chopped red chilli.

Stir through hot noodles or drizzle onto grilled fish for a delicious meal.

Can be stored for a week in the fridge, in a screw top bottle.

Sarson's Malt VinegarEvery day, nearly 9 in 10 portions of chips are served with Sarson's Vinegar. That's 5.5 million litres every year - enough to fill nearly 2,000 Olympic-size swimming pools!

Created in 1794 by Thomas Sarson, it's the nation's number-one vinegar, with a definitive kick from specially brewed malt barley. Inside each signature pear-shaped bottle, Sarson's Vinegar is naturally fat and gluten free, and 100% free of artificial colours and preservatives!



The Sarson's range includes:

• Malt and Distilled Vinegar: great for chips
• Light Malt Vinegar: for chip-lovers who like a lighter flavour
• Pickling Strength Malt Vinegar: perfect for all your pickling needs
• Balsamic Vinegar: Perfect for salads

No Fantasy - This one is for real, lol.
HAVE A GUESS WHAT I'M HAVING FOR SUPPER TONIGHT WITH SMOKED BACON.
YUMMY YUMMY YUM


Cauliflower cheese is a quintessentially traditional British food. A cauliflower cheese recipe is so easy, and versatile - it appears throughout British food in various guises; an essential side dish at Sunday lunch, a delicious filling for a baked potato and sometimes, even encased in pastry as a pasty or quiche.

Making Cauliflower Cheese makes the most of British cauliflowers which are not only cheap but available almost year round.

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: Serves 6 as a side dish

Ingredients:

1 medium cauliflower (approx 1lb/450g)
2 oz/ 55g butter
2 oz/ 55g all purpose/plain flour
1 level tsp mustard powder (optional)
Large pinch salt
1 pint / 460 ml milk
50g cheddar cheese or similar, grated plus extra for sprinkling on top
Freshly ground pepper

Preparation:

  Cauliflower Cheese  Serves 6 as a side dish
Heat the oven to 395F/200C/Gas 7
Remove the green outer leaves from the cauliflower and steam whole over a pan of boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove the cauliflower from the heat and leave to cool.
Place the butter and flour into a large saucepan. Over a low heat stir the butter and flour until the butter has melted and the flour is incorporated. Add the salt and mustard powder and continue stirring for 2 minutes.
Turn the heat up to medium and add the milk in one go and whisk furiously until all a smooth sauce is formed. Continue stirring until the sauce is thickened and glossy (about 5 minutes) If the sauce is very thick add a little more milk, the sauce should be thick but still runny. Add the grated cheese and stir until melted. Remove from the heat.
Break the cauliflower florets from the thick, central stalk taking care not to break it into tiny pieces. Place the florets in a baking dish large enough to hold all the florets in one layer.
Pour the thickened cheeee sauce over the cauliflower ensuring all the florets are covered. Sprinkle with grated cheese and a good twist of black pepper.
Bake in the hot oven until the sauce is bubbling and golden brown on the top, approx 30 minutes.


TEASET FOR ONE

DODIES DREAM KITCHEN

WITH A LITTLE BIT OF INFORMATION ABOUT BRITAIN'S

MAIN DRINK OF THE PEOPLE

TEA

THE  TEETOTALER'S INTOXICANT. (1893 - ish)

          In all ages and climes the various peoples of the earth have been addicted to the consumption of some more or less stimulating national beverage. Since the dawn of history the Arabian has drunk his coffee, the Mexican his "chocolate" and the Chinaman his tea, while the Indian has chewed his betel nut and the natives of Central Africa his kola.

          From China to Peru men savage and civilised alike seem always to have felt the need of "refreshers," either of the nervous or muscular forces, and to have sought and found the desired restorative most suited to their respective wants in the fields or forests of their native lands.    In those less favoured regions where Nature did not supply a beverage ready to hand, man soon learned how to assist her, and from the grain that gave him bread produced fire-water, and with the aid of the flowers of the field, the mead that was poured into the flagons at Valhalla.

          But it is to one of the gentler, yet not the most innocent, stimulants of nerve and brain that belongs the honour of the first place amonge the beverages of humanity.  For many centuries beer and fire-water of one kind or another held undisputed dominion over the taste of the temperate zones.

THE DISCOVERY OF TEA WHICH . .

A Lovely Cup of Tea.


          But in the Flowery Land, some hundred years after Cæsar's soldiers learned to drink beer in Gaul, men began to make a decoction from the leaves of a Corean plant which was one day to be the favourite drink of mankind from the Tropics to the Polar circles.

          For about 700 years the Children of the Sun kept their discoveries very much to themselves, but in 729 the enlightened Chommo Tenno, Mikado of Japan, entertained a deputation of Buddhist priests from Korea (then spelt Corea) and thenceforth the culture of tea spread through his dominions with that wonderful rapidity which has always characterised its march of conquest.

          By  the beginning of the ninth century in Japan, as in China, no meal was complete without a cup of tea, and no host or tradesman thought of receiving a visitor or customer without offering him a fragrant cup, which with all due difference in both cheers and inebriates. here too, by the way, the institution of five o'clock tea first received the sanction of polite society.


        Tea seems to have found its way into Europe through the caravan routes to early Russia early in the seventeenth century, and it made its first appearance on an English table in the year 1657. The first export of British grown tea to England consisted of the crop of 1837, and thus the Jubilee of her Majesty's (Queen Victoria) reign was also the jubilee of the British-Indian tea growing industry.

           Since 1657 its popularity has increased to an extent which is impossible to contemplate without giving somewhat more than a passing thought to the fiercely debated question of the effects of tea-drinking on the brain and general nervous system.

(Please remember this news report was written in 1893 in "The Search Light Monthly")

Tea-drinking is a matter which concerns the whole civilised world, and the latter-day development of the Temperance controversy has brought it into strong relief owing to the fact that the opponents of alcohol are to a man and woman devoted to the tea-pot, and doubtless find in it the solace and stimulus to jaded nerves which they condemn others for seeking in what their orators take a delight in describing as "the Lethe of Alcohol."

. . . . . THOUGH UNIVERSALLY CRAVED FOR

          There is, of course, no way of avoiding the conclusion that the demand for tea is the expression of a natural, and therefore healthy desire. The remarkable fact that in three different continents men have for ages used the leaves or seeds of plants having no outward resemblance to each other to brew beverages whose active principle was identical , is sufficient proof that that principle was intended by the economy of nature to be of service to humanity, and that humanity distinctly felt the want of it.

. . . . IS A DANGEROUS DRUG

The Deadly Drink

The downside of spending the whole evening drinking tea is that when I got home past 10 I was really feeling the ‘tea buzz’ (apparently there’s even a name for that in Chinese,  Cha Zui). So I couldn’t go to bed until past 3am, although I had to get up early, and then felt kind of hungover the next day. As it turns out, you can drink too much tea…

I found this in a blog called  "The Forbidden Meat - Drunk on Tea"

          But, on the other hand, it is equally undeniable that the subtle but potent drug which gives charm and stimulating force to a draught of tea is, by reason of its very subtlety, peculiarly liable to abuse.  In the case of alcohol there comes a time to everyone who is not a drunkard when the stimulant itself gives the warning that the limit of prudence has been reached.  He who passes that line does so knowing that moral debasement and physical ruin lie on the other side; but *theine gives no warning that can be understood by the non medical mind until its deadly work is almost done.

          It stimulates the nerve-centres and quickens the heart's action so gradually, and, at first, so gently and agreeably, and the accompanying tannin impairs the coats of the stomach so insidiously, that until shattered nerves and ruined digestion begin to make life a burden the victim does not see that he has been slowly poisoning himself for years.

. . . . OF NERVE-SHATTERING PROPENSITIES

          There can be little doubt but that the "Nerve-weakness" and irritability, which are the salient characteristics of this hard-driven, over-worried generation, are to a very great extent attributable to the enormous increase in tea-drinking which the latter half of the century has witnessed.  As the consumption of tea goes on increasing it is only reasonable to suppose that the effects of theine will become more and more marked.  Over sensitive nerves and impaired digestions are already the rule in "civilised" countries, and unless some strange revolution in the tastes and habits of men weans them from the subtle seduction of theine, the millions of money that tea-culture has produced will have been dearly bought indeed..

 * THEINE - Caffeine is called Theine when it's found in Tea but it's the same molecule     WOW thats an eye-opener, its amazing to think the harmless cup of tea is a very potent and can kill. and this is not the tannin but the Theine . 

     DODIES DREAM KITCHEN

INVITES YOU TO RECIPES FROM LONG AGO.

Most of these recipes are at least fourty year's old but many, you will find even older and more daring.  I must admit to not trying every one of them myself, mainly due to the ingedients not the taste, which I am sure is delicious.

This first one is a little more up to date

Lemon Puffs (frozen)

I found most of these recipes loose in old Books I have acquired over the years,  I don't even know what some of the ingredients are but will hope the answer will be somewhere on my P.C. Here goes let's give them a try.

DODIES DREAM WORLD in DODIES KITCHEN

Autumn and Acorns

INVITES YOU TO RECIPES FROM LONG AGO.

Most of these recipes are at least fourty year's old but many, you will find even older and more daring.  I must admit to not trying every one of them myself, mainly due to the ingedients not the taste, which I am sure is delicious.

I think with it being Autumn a few recipes for this time of year wouldn't go amiss. ENJOY!

But before all that to accompany these recipe I have decided to add a little about the history of food and its changing habits over the years. not in any special order, today it could be food that the good King Henry ate, then the next might be Victorian or even what we bring in from abroad. Just enjoy the whole feast  that will be spread before you. Apples and Blackberries, definitely Autumnal and definitely centuries old.

AppleApples originated in the Middle East more than 4000 years ago; fruit have   been grown in the UK as a cultivated crop since the Roman occupation. Specially cultivated apple varieties spread across Europe to France, arriving in England at around the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066; and the Crab-tree apple or the Wild Apple Tree (Pyrus malus) may be a descendant of these early varieties.  The demise of rural areas and apple growing, commencing in the 13th Century with the Black Death, the War of the Roses and repeated droughts, was reversed by Henry VIII who instructed his fruiterer, Richard Harris, to establish the first large scale orchards at Teynham in Kent. Scouring the known world for the best fruit, the majority were pippin varieties or eating apples.

Blackberries have also grown across Asia, Europe and the Americas for tens of thousands of years. blackberryArchaeological records show that European inhabitants ate them as long ago as 8,000 BC.

During World War One, children in England were given time off school to collect blackberries for the production of juice that was sent to soldiers to help maintain health.

Today there are over 2,000 varieties found throughout the cooler regions of the world. Blackberries are more highly prized as a food in Britain and Northern Europe than anywhere else in the world.

And so with those few facts we shall get on with this small recipe.  So set your oven to 185°c or gas mark 4 , then start preparing yourpudding;

Stuffed Apples with Fresh Blackberries

Ingredients

Apples and Blackberries

Sugar or Golden syrup

Peel and core sufficient apples for your diners.

Press the blackberries to a pulp and mix with either brown sugar or golden syrup.

Press this pulp down well into the opening of the apples, and if there is any left over throw it among the apples when you have placed them in the casserole or pie dish. Cover the dish with a plate, and cook in a moderate oven till soft.

Serve hot with custard or fresh cream.

And that is it! all of the recipe given in the Farmhouse Fare cookery book, compiled by The Farmers Weekly in 1954, and  from Mrs Livingstone who hailed from Warwickshire.


I do like these flowers

And what of all those apples and blackberries you have left over? Well what about some Blackberry and apple jam. This recipe also comes from a lady in Warwickshire, Mrs C. Harper and from the same wonderful Farmhouse Fare.

Easy to make Blackberry and Apple Jam.

3½ lbs.  Apples (windfalls will do)           2 lbs.     Blackberries.

3½ lbs   Sugar                                              1 teacup of cold water (not a Mug)

Do try to use a preserving pan, as most of the ordinary pans of today , won't take the heat of jam preserving.

Peel, core and cut the apples into thin slices and put in the preserving pan with the tea cup of water. Let them simmer until tender; then add the blackberries and boil together for 5 minutes before adding the sugar.

     Bring back to the boil and boil well for 25 to 30 minutes. 

Check for setting by placing a little of the jam on a cold, saucer, if ready it will set.

Oh my goodness, something I just remembered from my childhood and my mother who was a cook by trade. 

"Dorothy, have you remembered to take the pan off the fire before testing."

Yes and I mean the fire. We were lucky to have a huge range, with arms that folded across the fire to cook on. I'm afraid even in the fifties and early sixties electricity still wasn't the cooking genre that we used in the tiny Welsh village of "Bontnewydd" it was cooking on the fire and ironing with a flat iron. Aladdin Lamps and the loo was outside behind the holly bush in its own private shed. We were posh mind for our outside loo had two holes in, which meant you could take your younger sibling out with you to keep you company in the dark of night.

My Oh My, those were the days alright!

Good Cooking,  Dodie x

Here are some beautiful Autumn colours for you to admire.

 " AUTUMN TINT OF TOHOKU"



DODIES DREAM WORLD

INVITES YOU TO RECIPES FROM LONG AGO.

Most of these recipes are at least fourty year's old but many, you will find even older and more daring.  I must admit to not trying every one of them myself, mainly due to the ingedients not the taste, which I am sure is delicious.

I found most of these recipes loose in old Books I have acquired over the years, I don't even know what some of the ingredients are but will hope the answer will be somewhere on my P.C. Here goes let's give it a try.

Marshmellow Delight

Graham CrackerGraham Cracker and Graham Flour Storage and Cooking Tips

Graham flour has a short shelf life

By Peggy Trowbridge Filippone, About.com Guide

Graham flour will quickly turn rancid. Buy only what you will use in a month's time. Store in a sealed bag or container in a cool, dry, dark place, preferably in the refrigerator or freezer. At room temperature, graham flour will turn rancid in about a month. Refrigerated graham flour will last about 3 months, while keeping it in the freezer can prolong its life up to 6 months.

Graham crackers are easily frozen. Place unopened or opened packages in zip-top heavy-duty freezer bags and suck out all the air. They should keep up to one year.

Graham Flour and Crackers Cooking Tips and Usage

• Never sift graham flour.

• Graham flour may be substituted for most of the white flour in breads, but it may need longer cooking.

• Breads made with graham flour will be coarser and denser.

• Turn whole graham crackers into crumbs by whirling in a food processor or place in a heavy-duty plastic bag and

    roll with a rolling pin.

• 15 graham cracker squares = 1 cup graham cracker crumbs.

• 1 pound graham flour = 3-1/3 cups stirred.


DODIES DREAM WORLD

INVITES YOU TO RECIPES FROM LONG AGO.

Most of these recipes are at least fourty year's old but many, you will find even older and more daring.  I must admit to not trying every one of them myself, mainly due to the ingedients not the taste, which I am sure is delicious.

I found most of these recipes loose in old Books I have acquired over the years, I don't even know what some of the ingredients are but will hope the answer will be somewhere on my P.C. Here goes let's give it a try.

Ancient Bread Pudding Recipe

Directions continued; Butter the bread on both sides and then cut into four triangles. place around the dish, making sure to cover the bottem and sides. ( I use a Pyrex Dish)

Beat the eggs and add to the milk, then add the raisins, cinnamon and sugar , (though you can use any fruit if you wish. Not too much though.)

Pour the wet mixture onto the bread and butter and leave to stand for at least an hour to give the mixture time to wet the bread and butter.  I prefer to leave out the cinnamon and instead, scatter a few pats of butter on the surface and some nutmeg. Cook in middle of oven for around 40 mins or until done.

Try not to leave and of the crusts showing as they will burn in the oven and spoil the look.

I would love to know when this was printed from "Allrecipes and if Ellen Warfield is still sending in her recipes, in fact I think I shall go and check it out later. Prepare yourself fo a link later xxx

Do you know there is another bread and butter pudding you can make, this time a savoury one.

1       Butter and triangle the bread and place in dish as before, then beat the eggs and add to milk.

2       but instead of the fruit and vanilla and sugar. Use any the following ingredients cut into bite size pieces;

3       Mushrooms, Broccilli, Carrots, Spring Onions, Peppers, etc. You can even add a handful of grated chedder                      cheese.

4       Add the veg to the wet mix and pour over the bread adding salt and pepper instead of the sugar. (Garlic Optional)

You can have this as a main meal or cold snack for lunch time. Beautiful.



DODIES DREAM WORLD

INVITES YOU TO RECIPES FROM LONG AGO.

Most of these recipes are at least fourty year's old but many, you will find even older and more daring.  I must admit to not trying every one of them myself, mainly due to the ingedients not the taste, which I am sure is delicious.

I found most of these recipes loose in old Books I have acquired over the years, I don't even know what some of the ingredients are but will hope the answer will be somewhere on my P.C. Here goes let's give it a try.

Carrot Pudding

To Steam the pudding. Place all the ingrediants in a bowl and mix thoroughly adding the melted butter last to bind them a little. place the mixture in a pudding basin covered and secured with greaseproof paper, then steam. If you are only making a small pudding you mightn't need a full three hours of steam.


To make a nice sauce for this pudding use;

1 cup icing sugar,  1 egg,   ½ cup of butter,  Vanilla pod or essence

Preferably cooked in double boiler, as are most custards, Then when ready  and cooled, add to a pint or less of whipping cream.


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This is the link for the Kitchen/ Double Boilers at Amazon.co.uk

www.amazon.co.uk/kitchen+amazon



My husband is a Vegan of long standing and he found this recipe very nice in deed but I did cut the sugar down a bit as a cup of sugar would have been far too sweet for him. And of course the Sauce was out of the question, xxx

By definition the kitchen is a room used for food preparation that is typically equipped with a stove, a sink for cleaning food and dish-washing, and cabinets and refrigerators for storing food and equipment.

Kitchens have been around for centuries, however, it was not until post-civil war period that the majority of kitchen appliances were invented. The reason was that most people no longer had servants and housewives working alone in the kitchen needed culinary help. Also the advent of electricity greatly advanced the technology of labor saving kitchen appliances.

The bain-marie or double boiler comes in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and types, but traditionally is a wide, cylindrical, usually metal container made of three or four basic parts: a handle, an outer (or lower) container that holds the working liquid, an inner (or upper), smaller container that fits inside the outer one and which holds the material to be heated or cooked, and sometimes a base underneath. Under the outer container of the bain-marie (or built into its base) is a heat source.

Typically the inner container is immersed about halfway into the working liquid.

The smaller container, filled with the substance to be heated, fits inside the outer container, filled with the working liquid (usually water), and the whole is heated at, or below, the base, causing the temperature of the materials in both containers to rise as needed. The insulating action of the water helps to keep contents of the inner pot from boiling or scorching.

Of course you can always use two different size saucepans but it can be a bit dangerous having to hold a hot pan overa pan of boiling water


The nineteenth-century created numerous kitchen use inventions: toasters, potato mashers, apple/potato peelers, food choppers and sausage stuffers were all invented. Over 185 patents for coffee grinders and over 500 patents for apple/potato peelers were patented in the 1800s. Early peelers were made of iron and the patent number and other information was included in the casting. Peelers ranged from the familiar and simple round swiveling rod with a knife blade that peeled skin, to contraptions full of gears and wheels that could peel, core, slice and section. There were separate peelers designed for different fruits and vegetables; there were even peelers that removed the kernels from ears of corn.
Pressure Cooker
In 1679, French physicist Denis Papin invented the pressure cooker, called Papin's Digester, this airtight cooker produced a hot steam that cooked food more quickly while preserving nutrients.



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