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Dodie's Dream World - Complete Chaos! xxx
Nursery Rhymes

DODIES DREAM WORLDThe moon in the sky.
Nursery Rhymes for the little ones.

BABY - LAND.

"How many miles to Baby - land?"

"Anyone can tell :

Up one flight, to your right;

Please to ring the bell."


"What do they do in Baby - land?"

"Dream and wake and play;

Laugh and crow, shout and grow;

Happy times have they!"...

DODIES DREAM WORLD
Nursery Rhymes for the little ones
Share
HAVE you ever heard of the Sugar-Plum Tree? A beautiful Sugar-plum tree
'Tis a marvel of great renown! 
It blooms on the shore of the Lollypop Sea
In the garden of Shut-Eye Town;
The fruit that it bears is so wondrously sweet
(As those who have tasted it say)
That good little children have only to eat
Of that fruit to be happy next day.

When you've got to the tree, you would have a hard time
To capture the fruit which I sing;
The tree is so tall that no person could climb
To the boughs where the sugar-plums swing! 
But up in that tree sits a chocolate cat, 
And a ginger bread dog prowls below-
And this is the way you contrive to get at
Those sugar-plums tempting you so: 

A beautiful Sugar-plum tree
You say but the word to that gingerbread dog
And he barks with such a terrible zest
That the chocolate cat is at once all agog,
As her swelling proportions attest. 
And the chocolate cat goes covorting around
From this leafy limb unto that,
And the sugar-plums tumble, of course, to the ground-
Hurray for that chocolate cat!

There are marshmallows, gumdrops, and peppermint canes
With striping of scarlet and gold,
And you carry away of the treasure that rains,
As much as your apron can hold!
So come, little child, cuddle closer to me
In your dainty white nightcap and gown,
And I'll rock you away to the Sugar-Plum Tree
In the garden of Shut-Eye Town.
NO NEED TO ASK WHO THIS IS BY, ONE OF MY FAVOURITE POETS. THE WONDERFUL EUGENE FIELD, I DO SO LOVE HIS POEMS FOR CHILDREN.

DODIES DREAM WORLD

Nursery Rhymes Inc

 
I love this little poem by Marjorie  Wilson, she  was the sister of Captain T P Cameron
the war poet: 1889-1918. Their Father was the Reverend T Cameron Wilson of Little Eaton in Derbyshire. Marjorie's War Work included nursing service with the Voluntary Aid Detachment and with the War Relief Office.
She left a big hole in Britains poetry and rhymes dying so very, very young,
but we thank her for what she did leave us.

THE OLD WOMAN IN THE ATTIC

My little room is high up in the house,
The rain's small feet pit-patter.
No one comes.
Lonely it is. Sometimes a soft, small mouse
Peeps out with frightened eyes to find my crumbs.
I have grown old in this small attic room.
One after one my dear friends went away.
In the still night how black the shadows loom!
But shadows do not last; they go by day.
I have a roof (so close). I have a fire.
I would not change my garret room, not even
For a grand floor below: there is none higher;
, The floor above this little room is heaven.


Marjorie Wilson 1889 - 1918
Also by Majorie Wilson

REMEMBRANCE POEM: 'TO TONY – AGED 3 (IN MEMORY: T. P. C. W.)'

The poem entitled 'To Tony – Aged 3'
was written in 1918 by Marjorie Wilson in memory of her brother, T P Cameron Wilson ('T. P. C. W.'), a casualty of World War I. Also a poet, he was serving as an officer in the 10th Sherwood Foresters when he was killed in action at Hermies, France, in 1918.
 Many of the children of soldiers killed in combat were – are – too young to know or remember their fathers, so it falls to relations to tell them about their parents and of the sacrifices that they made....


Asian Connections


THE FLY-AWAY HORSE
 by Eugene Field
Oh, a wonderful horse is the Fly-Away Horse -
I am seeking those far-away-landsPerhaps you have seen him before;
Perhaps, while you slept, his shadow has swept
Through the moonlight that floats on the floor.
For it's only at night, when the stars twinkle bright,
That the Fly-Away Horse, with a neigh
And a pull at his rein and a toss of his mane,
Is up on his heels and away!
The moon in the sky.
The moon in the sky,
As he gallopeth by,
Cries: "Oh! what a marvelous sight!"
And the stars in dismay
Hide their faces away
In the lap of old Grandmother Night.

It is yonder, out yonder, the Fly-Away Horse
I am seeking those far-away-landsSpeedeth ever and ever away -
Over meadows and lanes, over mountains and plains,
Over streamlets that sing at their play;
And over the sea like a ghost sweepeth he,
While the ships they go sailing below,
And he speedeth so fast that the men at the mast
Adjudge him some portent of woe.
"What ho there!" they cry,A whale ! I don't think so he he he
As he flourishes by
With a whisk of his beautiful tail;
And the fish in the sea
Are as scared as can be,
From the nautilus up to the whale!



I am seeking those far-away-landsAnd the Fly-Away Horse seeks those faraway lands
You little folk dream of at night -
Where candy-trees grow, and honey-brooks flow,
And corn-fields with popcorn are white;
And the beasts in the wood are ever so good
To children who visit them there -
What glory astride of a lion to ride,
Monkeys hanging from the trees
Or to wrestle around with a bear!
The monkeys, they say:
"Come on, let us play,"

And they frisk in the coconut-trees:
While the parrots, that cling
To the peanut-vines, sing
Or converse with comparative ease!

Off! scamper to bed - you shall ride him tonight!
I am seeking those far-away-landsFor, as soon as you've fallen asleep,
With a jubilant neigh he shall bear you away
Over forest and hillside and deep!
But tell us, my dear, all you see and you hear
In those beautiful lands over there,
Where the Fly-Away Horse wings his faraway course
With the wee one consigned to his care.
Then grandma will cry
In amazement: "Oh, my!"
And she'll think it could never be so;
And only we two
Shall know it is true -
You and I, little precious! shall know!

Can't you tell it's from the pen of the amazing Eugene Field.

 Here is the New Toy's Experiment for advertising there wares.
There are two separate site pages.
 This one is Toys the other Toys 2 makes sense really :)
Embarassed
Toys vary from Game figures to Cuddlies.

 OLD MOTHER GOOSE AND HER GANDER

Old Mother Goose when she wanted to wander,
     Would ride through the air on a very fine gander.
          Mother Goose had a house, 'twas built in a wood,
               Where an owl at the door for sentinal stood.


 This is her son Jack, a plain looking lad,
     He is not very good, nor yet very bad.
          She sent him to market, A live goose he bought;
               "Here Mother," says he, "It will not go for nought."

Jack's goose and her gander grew very fond;
     They'd both eat together, Or swim in the pond.
          Jack found one morning as I have been told,
               His goose had laid him an egg of pure gold.




Jack sold his gold egg to a rogue of a Jew,
     Who cheated him out of the half of his due.
          The Jack went a courting a lady so gay,
               As fair as the lily, as sweet as the may.

Then old Mother Goose that instant came in,
     And turned her son Jack into famed Harlequin.
        The Jew and the Squire came behind his back,
               And began to belabour the sides of poor Jack.



She then with her wand touched the lady so fine
     And turned her at once into sweet Columbine.
          The gold egg into the sea was thrown in,
               When Jack jumped in and got it back again.



The Jew got the goose, which he vowed he would kill,
     Resolving at once his pockets to fill.
         Jack's mother came in, and caught the goose soon,
               And, mounting its back, flew back to the moon.




 A NURSERY RHYME PIN BOARD
Mouse over the picture to see the rhyme,
Try and guess what it is first though.

Sing a song of sixpence, a pocket full of ryeHey diddile diddle the Cat and the Fiddle












Bye Baby Bunting, Daddies gon a hunting


Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep, and doesn't know where to find themThree little kittens, they lost their mittens....

Ring a ring a rosie, a pocket full of posies....

The Queen of Hearts, she made some tarts...












Doctor Foster went to Glouster....Humpty-Dumpty sat on the wall



 THE MOTHER TO HER INFANT

This Lullaby Rhyme is by Thomas Miller,
the basket maker who attracted some notice as a writer for and about children.


Slumber, my darling, no danger is near,
     Thy mother sits by thee to guard thy repose;
Though the wind roars aloud, not a breath reaches here
     To shake the white curtains which round thee do close:
Then slumber, my darling, and sleep without fear,
     Thou art safe from all danger, my dearest, while here.




What is it the angels do unto thee say
     When thou does lie smiling so sweet in thy sleep?
Are they trying , my sweetest, to lure thee away,
And leave me alone in my sorrow to weep?
Oh, sometimes I fancy they whisper thy name,
     And would fain bear thee back to the land whence they came.

Slumber, my darling, no danger is near
Then never, my darling, when thou growest old
     Forget her who on thy sweet infancy smiled,
To whom thou wert dearer than jewels and gold,
     Who studied thy looks and thy wishes, my child,
Who, when thou didst need her, was never away,
     In health or in sickness, by night or by day.

     

Perfection I think, thank you Thomas Miller.

 WELL WE STARTED THE PAGE WITH MOTHER GOOSE AND NOW FOR SOME OF HER RHYMES SUNG FOR YOU INSTEAD.

Little Boy Blue....
I SHOULD THINK THAT YOU CAN GET THE WHOLE FAMILY
TO JOIN IN
WITH YOU AS WELL.



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